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IGNOU CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-23 Download Free : IGNOU CHR 11 Human Rights in India Solved Assignment 2022-2023 , IGNOU CHR 11 Assignment 2022-23 , IGNOU CHR 11 Assignment , CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-23 Download Free IGNOU Assignments 2022-23- Certificate Programmes Assignment 2022-23 Gandhi National Open University had recently uploaded the assignments of the present session for Certificate Programmes for the year 2022-23. Courses such as CSWM, CVG, CAFE/DAFE, CIS comes under the Certificate Programmes category. IGNOU Certificate Programmes courses give students the freedom to choose any subject according to their preference.  Students are recommended to download their Assignments from this webpage itself. IGNOU solved assignment 2022-23 ignou dece solved assignment 2022-23, ignou ma sociology assignment 2022-23 meg 10 solved assignment 2022-23 ts 6 solved assignment 2022-23 , meg solved assignment 2022-23 .




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IGNOU CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-23

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Important Note – IGNOU CHR 11 Human Rights in India Solved Assignment 2022-2023  Download Free You may be aware that you need to submit your assignments before you can appear for the Term End Exams. Please remember to keep a copy of your completed assignment, just in case the one you submitted is lost in transit.




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Submission Date :

  • 31st March 2033 (if enrolled in the July 2033 Session)
  • 30th Sept, 2033 (if enrolled in the January 2033 session).

Answer any 10 questions. Each question carries 10 marks.


1. Critically analyse the various rights contained in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, 1966.

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) is a multilateral treaty adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (GA) on 16 December 1966 through GA. Resolution 2200A (XXI), and came in force from 3 January 1976. It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to the Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories and individuals, including labour rights and the right to health, the right to education, and the right to an adequate standard of living. As of July 2020, the Covenant has 171 parties. A further four countries, including the United States, have signed but not ratified the Covenant.

The ICESCR (and its Optional Protocol) is part of the International Bill of Human Rights, along with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), including the latter’s first and second Optional Protocols.

The Covenant is monitored by the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

The ICESCR has its roots in the same process that led to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A “Declaration on the Essential Rights of Man” had been proposed at the 1945 San Francisco Conference which led to the founding of the United Nations, and the Economic and Social Council was given the task of drafting it. Early on in the process, the document was split into a declaration setting forth general principles of human rights, and a convention or covenant containing binding commitments. The former evolved into the UDHR and was adopted on 10 December 1948.

Drafting continued on the convention, but there remained significant differences between UN members on the relative importance of negative civil and political versus positive economic, social and cultural rights. These eventually caused the convention to be split into two separate covenants, “one to contain civil and political rights and the other to contain economic, social and cultural rights.” The two covenants were to contain as many similar provisions as possible, and be opened for signature simultaneously. Each would also contain an article on the right of all peoples to self-determination.

The States Parties to the present Covenant, including those having responsibility for the administration of Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories, shall promote the realisation of the right of self-determination, and shall respect that right, in conformity with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations.

The first document became the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and the second the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. The drafts were presented to the UN General Assembly for discussion in 1954, and adopted in 1966.

The Covenant follows the structure of the UDHR and the ICCPR, with a preamble and thirty-one articles, divided into five parts.

Part 1 (Article 1) recognises the right of all peoples to self-determination, including the right to “freely determine their political status”, pursue their economic, social and cultural goals, and manage and dispose of their own resources. It recognises a negative right of a people not to be deprived of its means of subsistence, and imposes an obligation on those parties still responsible for non-self governing and trust territories (colonies) to encourage and respect their self-determination.

Part 2 (Articles 2–5) establishes the principle of “progressive realisation” (see below.) It also requires the rights be recognised “without discrimination of any kind as to race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status”. The rights can only be limited by law, in a manner compatible with the nature of the rights, and only for the purpose of “promoting the general welfare in a democratic society”.

Part 3 (Articles 6–15) lists the rights themselves. These include rights to

  • work, under “just and favourable conditions”, with the right to form and join trade unions (Articles 6, 7, and 8);
  • social security, including social insurance (Article 9);
  • family life, including paid parental leave and the protection of children (Article 10);
  • an adequate standard of living, including adequate food, clothing and housing, and the “continuous improvement of living conditions” (Article 11);
  • health, specifically “the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health” (Article 12);
  • education, including free universal primary education, generally available secondary education and equally accessible higher education. This should be directed to “the full development of the human personality and the sense of its dignity”, and enable all persons to participate effectively in society (Articles 13 and 14);
  • participation in cultural life (Article 15).

As negative and positive rights are rights that oblige either action (positive rights) or inaction (negative rights), many of these aforementioned rights include specific actions which must be undertaken to realise them, as they are positive economic, social and cultural rights that go beyond relatively inaction-based civil and political negative rights.

Part 4 (Articles 16–25) governs reporting and monitoring of the Covenant and the steps taken by the parties to implement it. It also allows the monitoring body – originally the United Nations Economic and Social Council – now the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights – see below – to make general recommendations to the UN General Assembly on appropriate measures to realise the rights (Article 21)

Part 5 (Articles 26–31) governs ratification, entry into force, and amendment of the Covenant.

2. Critically evaluate the key principles of the Convention on the Rights of Child, 1989.

The United Nations Convention on the ‘Rights of the Child’ is an international statement of the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of children. The UN General Assembly adopted the Convention and opened it for signature on 20 November 1989 (the 30th anniversary of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child).

Guiding principles: General requirements for all rights

Article 1 (definition of the child)

Everyone under 18 years of age has all the rights in this convention.

Article 2  (without discrimination)

The convention applies to everyone whatever their race, religion, abilities, whatever they think or say, and whatever type of family they come from.

Article 3 (best interests of the child)

All organisations concerned with children should work towards what is best for every child.

Article 4 (protection of rights)

Governments must do all they can to fulfil the rights of every child.

Article 6 (survival and development)

Every child has the right to life. Governments must take necessary steps to ensure that children survive and grow up well.

Article 12 (respect for the views of the child)

Children have the right to say what they think in all matters that may affect them and to have their opinion taken into account.

Article 7 (registration, name, nationality, care)

Children have the right to a legally registered name and nationality. They also have the right to know and, as far as possible, to be cared for, by their parents.

Article 9 (separation from parents)

Children should not be separated from their respective parents unless it is for their own good, for example, if a parent is abusing or neglecting a child). In the event of their parents getting separated, they have the right to stay in contact with both parents, unless this might harm them.

Article 20 (children deprived of a family)

If the children cannot be looked after by their own family, governments should ensure that they are looked after properly by people who respect their religion, culture and language.

Article 22 (refugee children)

If children have come into the country as refugees,then it is important that they have the same rights as children born here. Also adequate steps are to be taken to make sure that these children are reunited with their families, wherever possible.

Article 23 (with disability)

Every child with a disability has the right to live a decent life with dignity, independence and an active role in the community. They are entitled to special care and support to lead such a life..

Article 24 (health and health services)

Children have the right to good quality health care, clean water, nutritious food and a clean environment, so that you they stay healthy.

Article 25 (review of treatment in care)

Those children who are under the care of any local authority (hospital, custody etc), rather than by their parents, have the right of review of their treatment and situation regularly.

Article 26 (social security)

Children have the right for help from the Government if they are poor or in need.

Article 27 (adequate standard of living)

Every child has the right to a standard of living that is good enough to meet their physical and mental needs. The Government should help their families, if they cannot afford to provide this.

Article 28 (right to education)

Every child has the right to an education. Primary education must be free. Secondary education must be available to every child.

Article 29 (goals of education)

Education should develop your personality and talents to the maximum extent. It should encourage the child’s respect for human rights as well as respect for their parents, their own and other cultures and the environment.

Article 30 (children of minorities)

Every child has the right to learn and use the language, customs and religion of their family, whether or not these are shared by the majority of people in the country.

Article 31 (leisure, play and culture)

Children have the right to relax, play and join in a wide range of cultural and extra-curricular activities.

Article 42 (awareness of rights)

The Government should make the convention known to all parents and children.

3. Who are called refugees? What are the Rights available to them.
4. Discuss the role of the treaty based machinery for the implementation of human rights. How far they have been successful in protecting human rights.


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5. Discuss the contribution of Human Rights Committee in the field of human rights.
6. Write a note on Human Rights and Natural Rights
7. Discuss the contribution made by the Vienna Congress (1993) in the area of human rights.
8. Discuss the challenges posed to the human rights by Terrorism



9. What do you understand by the term Self-determination? Discuss the provisions contained in the U.N. Charter regarding the right of self-determination.
10. Who are called Indigenous People? Discuss the challenges faced by them to their human rights.
11. Write a note on Committee Against Torture
12. Discuss the contribution of Human rights Watch in the field of Human Rights.


IGNOU CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-23

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IGNOU Instructions for the CHR 11 Human Rights in India Solved Assignment 2022-23

IGNOU CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-23 Download Free  Before attempting the assignment, please read the following instructions carefully.

  1. Read the detailed instructions about the assignment given in the Handbook and Programme Guide.
  2. Write your enrolment number, name, full address and date on the top right corner of the first page of your response sheet(s).
  3. Write the course title, assignment number and the name of the study centre you are attached to in the centre of the first page of your response sheet(s).
  4. Use only foolscap size paperfor your response and tag all the pages carefully
  5. Write the relevant question number with each answer.
  6. You should write in your own handwriting.



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IGNOU CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-23 You will find it useful to keep the following points in mind:

  1. Planning: Read the questions carefully. IGNOU CHR 11 Assignment 2022-23 Download Free Download PDF Go through the units on which they are based. Make some points regarding each question and then rearrange these in a logical order. And please write the answers in your own words. Do not reproduce passages from the units.
  2. Organisation: Be a little more selective and analytic before drawing up a rough outline of your answer. In an essay-type question, give adequate attention to your introduction and conclusion. IGNOU CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-2023 Download Free Download PDF The introduction must offer your brief interpretation of the question and how you propose to develop it. The conclusion must summarise your response to the question. In the course of your answer, you may like to make references to other texts or critics as this will add some depth to your analysis.
  3. Presentation: IGNOU CHR 11 Solved Assignment 2022-2023 Download Free Download PDF Once you are satisfied with your answers, you can write down the final version for submission, writing each answer neatly and underlining the points you wish to emphasize.

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